Politics and Libraries, part 1

Politics, policies, government, partisan divides…it all matters when we’re talking about the potential and the ability of libraries to continue providing services to their communities today and in the future.

We don’t claim to be experts on this subject…in fact, we are far from it. But in light of recent national news, in this episode Kyrstin, Caroline and I take a stab at grasping and articulating the implications of politics on and in library world. We briefly touch on topics such as gun legislation, funding, collective bargaining and Caroline’s experience at Iowa Library Legislative day.

“Libraries leverage the tiny amount of federal funds they receive through their states into an incredible range of services for virtually all Americans everywhere, so produce what could be the highest economic and social return on investment in the entire federal budget.” –Julie Todaro, President of the American Library Association, 2017

There’s definitely a lot to stay informed about, which can sometimes be overwhelming and challenging to do amidst our busy lives. Still, as professional librarians it’s important that we seek to understand the impact of politics on the work that we do and make an effort to publicly advocate for our libraries. If we do, we will have the potential to help bring about positive change for our communities.

Unique Library Collections

 

Libraries just loan books, right? Wrong. Libraries across the country contain more than just books. Recent University of Iowa SLIS program graduate Beth Paul conducted research  about the unique, non-book, “non-traditional” library collections that are currently active in libraries across the country.

“I was really interested in how the library is more than just books and how they [interesting collections] can bring in interesting people.” -Beth Paul, 2016

A screenshot of some of the music tools you can check out from the Ann Arbor District Library.

These unique library collections allow community members to borrow anything from artwork done by local, high quality posters, seeds, musical instruments, gardening tools, and board games, among other items. In addition, Iowa libraries have led the way in the establishment of a cake-pan lending system.

In this podcast we talk to Beth about what she discovered in her research regarding the popularity of these unique collections, why these libraries went about adopting these collections, how they maintain them, why these collections might be controversial, and how they might complement a future of maker spaces in libraries.

Check out these sites for additional inspiration :

 

 

Working as the Peace Corps Librarian

 

We’ve all heard of the Peace Corps, but have you heard of the Peace Corps librarian? And what exactly does a Peace Corps librarian do?

Recently, we were fortunate to speak with Kelly Grogg, a recent graduate of the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science. In this episode, Kelly provides us with a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to be the Peace Corps Librarian.

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“Since I am the only librarian and I have so many different roles, I get to do a little bit of all those things. There’s a little bit of the public librarian aspect where I get to answer questions from the public, I am managing a small library, I am sort of the default historian and archivist for the Peace Corps, and I get to do a lot of in depth research for people here at headquarters like an academic librarian would do, and I get to do a lot of international calls and talk to people all around the world.” -Kelly Grogg, 2017

As the Peace Corps Librarian, Kelly is busy serving, supporting, and communicating with four different audiences: library staff at all Peace Corps offices around the world, Peace Corps volunteers in the field, staff at Headquarters at Washington D.C., and the general public. Kelly describes what it’s like to work as a solo librarian for a federal entity and she speaks about some of the projects she hopes to work on during her term as the Peace Corps librarian.

Although she will only hold this position temporarily (for five years), as a former Peace Corps volunteer, Kelly is grateful for this opportunity to educate others about the PeaceCorps and to share her library expertise with current Peace Corps volunteers in the field. As for the future…

“I know that I would be happy anywhere, as long as a got to work in a library and do work that I believe in, which is why I decided to become a librarian in the first place.” -Kelly Grogg, 2017

**This podcast was prepared or accomplished by Kelly Grogg in her personal capacity. The opinions expressed in this article are her own and do not reflect the view of the United States Peace Corps or the United States government.**